Find CNA Classes & Learn About The Field of Nurse Assisting & More!

Welcome to one of the Internet’s best CNA resources, CNAClassesDiscovery.com! This site has tons of great information to help make things easier for you as you embark on your journey to become a Certified Nursing Assistant. You’ll find information on CNA classes in every state across the country (located at the bottom of every state page), state-specific certification information, and even great resources like interview tips and other information for people who may have completed their schooling. Select your state below or keep reading to find out more.

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What is a CNA?

That’s a great question, and an even better place to start your quest for more information. First of all, just like it sounds, a CNA is an assistant to a registered nurse, or RN. A large part of a CNA’s work may encompass caring for the disabled, elderly, and other individuals who cannot care for themselves. CNAs may work directly with patients and perform a number of independent living tasks such as bathing, collecting specimens, and other supportive tasks. Some things that a CNA may regularly do may include:

  • Assisting with lifting or transportation of disabled patients
  • Obtaining specimens or samples for testing
  • Helping patients shop for groceries and prepare meals
  • Recording vital signs such as blood pressure, height, temperature, and weight
  • Assisting patients with rehabilitation exercises and other physical therapy
  • Providing emotional and mental support to patients and their families in times of need

So, as you can see, being a CNA may not be limited to being an assistant to a nurse; there may be many other responsibilities that may require a CNA to work directly with patients. These responsibilities may lead to extremely fulfilling experiences with patients, and may also be one of the reasons why the CNA profession tends to attract caring and compassionate individuals.

Obtaining a CNA Certification: Distance Learning and Traditional Classes

If being a CNA sounds like something you may want to do, that’s great! You’re most likely a compassionate, good-hearted person who enjoys helping others. But that leaves the question: what is the next step? Well, you’ll need to get your CNA certification for the state that you reside in, and in order to learn what you need to know to pass the licensing test, you may need to take a CNA certification course. If you have previous medical schooling and have worked in a related medical field such as an EMT or paramedic, you may be able to skip directly to the state test. This of course depends largely upon the state you live in, as well as the nature of your schooling and a number of other factors, so it’s best to check with your state’s Department of Health or the governing body that set the rules for CNA certification in your area to be know for sure. There may also be some other prerequisites that can vary from state-to-state that you may need to meet like being able to pass a background check or having current immunizations.

Just like some other professions, schooling may be an important of the process if you want to become a CNA. With that said, depending upon where you live, sometimes there are multiple options for CNA classes. Some states may allow you to choose from a blended distance learning/traditional class and a completely traditional (in-person) class. Both of these offer different paths to becoming a nursing assistant, but you have to decide which one is right for you, provided that your states allows both options. Some states may allow you to take a portion of your CNA classeson the internet, while others may require you to take 100% of the classes in person; again, this depends upon where you live and you’ll need to check with your state to see which options are available to you. All states do require you to complete your clinical schooling and laboratory hours in person; so no matter where you live you can’t take 100% of your classes online, it’s just not possible to learn all of the things that you need to know solely via the internet. On each state page (which can be accessed from the map above), you can find a list of schools at the bottom of the each page where you may be able to find CNA classes and schooling.

General CNA Information

After obtaining a CNA certification, you may want to begin looking for a job as a CNA. You might be wondering: “What kinds of places hire CNAs? Do I have to work in a hospital?” One thing about being a Certified Nursing Assistant is that CNAs they are taught to work in a variety of situations and this versatile schooling allows to you to possibly choose from a range of employment settings. Here are just a few of the settings that you may be able to work in as a CNA:

  • Hospitals
  • Doctor’s offices and clinics
  • Nursing homes
  • Assisted living facilities
  • Group homes
  • Private residences

And this list may not cover all of the possibilities. Essentially, as a CNA, you may be able to work in other places not listed above, although some states may limit what a CNA can do or where they can work.

Learning More

The healthcare/nursing field is one of the fastest-growing, professions that a person can choose according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics! Nursing can also be a very rewarding profession as well, which may make it a good choice for people who enjoy helping others.

If you like helping others, it may be a great time to get started doing something you love. That’s why this website was created—to help people who are interested in the becoming a nursing assistant better-understand how to reach their goals.

Please take the time to look around this website and take in some of the helpful information. Feel free to use the information at the bottom of each state page to locate schools that may offer CNA classes or programs. And don’t forget—the usefulness of this site doesn’t stop there! Come back and visit once you’re a CNA in order to learn some of the best tips on job interviews and take advantage of other great information! This site is proud to be a resource that goes truly goes full circle! Thanks for visiting!


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